100-year Goals and Targets

The Smith's 3kW

Bill and Shiela grew tired of their electricity bill and decided to do something about it. They got in touch with us and told us about their intentions of going solar. We went over, evaluated their roof and discussed their needs and expectations. They decided to install twelve panels on the southern roof of their home, which are expected to generate upwards of 3,900kWh per year. The panels will offset more than half of their electricity needs from the grid and make them less vulnerable from price increases. Now they have the peace of mind of a renewable source of energy that doesn’t come with any surprises or fuel payments. Congratulations to Bill and Shiela for becoming Solar Heroes!

100 Year Goals and Targets

Communications

Target 1
By 2036, 75 per cent of Calgarians report that they are informed.
Target 4
By 2036, Calgary increases the number of facilities and spaces that encourage human interaction, and they are widely distributed throughout the city.
Target 5
By 2036, 30 per cent of Calgary’s energy derives from low-impact renewable sources.
Target 6
By 2036, all new and retrofitted communities, buildings, vehicles, equipment and processes are built to be within five per cent of the highest energy-efficient design available out of all economically competitive products, as measured on a life cycle basis.

Economic well-being

Target 34
By 2036, research and development intensity, both public and private, increases to five per cent of Calgary’s gross domestic product.
Target 35
By 2036, the number of environmentally sustainable and commercially viable value-added products and technologies produced in Calgary increases by 100 per cent.
Target 36
By 2036, Calgary’s non-oil-related industries grow by 50 per cent.
Target 37
By 2036, Calgary is ranked as the most favourable Canadian city in which to establish businesses that support sustainability practices.
Target 38
By 2036, tourist visitations and expenditures grow by 90 per cent.
Target 39
By 2036, alternative ways to measure economic well-being are commonly used to support sustainability principles in decision-making.

Air

Target 67
By 2036, energy consumption is reduced by 30 per cent based on 1999 use.
Target 68
By 2036, the use of low-impact renewable energy increases by 30 per cent as a percentage of total energy use.
Target 69
By 2012, total community greenhouse gas emissions are reduced by six per cent from 1990 levels; by 2036, they’re reduced by 50 per cent from 1990 levels and criteria air contaminants are also significantly reduced.
Target 70
By 2036, indoor air contaminants are reduced to zero per cent.
Target 71
By 2036, Calgary’s ecological decreases to below the 2001 Canadian average of 7.25 hectares per capita.

Aesthetic enjoyment

Target 85
By 2036, 90 per cent of citizens report that Calgary is a beautiful city.
Target 86
By 2036, 95 per cent of Calgarians report that they have a range of opportunities for the aesthetic enjoyment of nature, arts and culture.

Street Store YYC

givoco, in partnership with the Alpha House Society, Calgary Mustard Seed, Drop In Centre and the Calgary Homeless foundation worked together to host the first Street Store event in Calgary as part of the Giving Tuesday movement. Volunteers and clients of the Alpha house put up over 200 posters around town to get clothing donations from the public and to raise awareness for the homeless about this event.

Over 60 bags of clothes were donated including many new and unworn items! The team at X929 collected enough bags of clothing to fill a small Volvo and employees at 8 ATB branches across the city all gave towards the cause filling the inside and bed of a pickup truck!

The Street Store YYC was held inside a vacant store at Eau Claire Market. Volunteers gathered at 8am to set up and get ready for the big day. We were scheduled to open our doors at 11am but at 10:30 there was a lineup outside so we opened early.Throughout the day we had over 200 guests shop at the Street Store YYC.

In a city like Calgary, where the cost of living is increasingly high it can be easy to find yourself without a home.  Struggles such as divorce, moving to a new city, family, age, medical conditions, and being laid off work are just a few of the reasons why people find themselves homeless. At the Street Store YYC, over 200 guests received items that they needed to get through another Calgary winter. From new coats, gloves, hats, socks, blankets, pants and shoes people left the Street Store thankful for everything they received.

For more information visist: www.givoco.com/street-store Click on the Impact tab to see the positive impact this event had! 

100 Year Goals and Targets

Meaning, purpose and connectedness

Target 101
By 2036, 90 per cent of citizens agree that “Calgary is a city with soul,” which is defined as citizens having meaning and purpose in life and experiencing ongoing feelings of connectedness with some form of human, historic or natural system.
Target 112
By 2010, 90 per cent of Calgarians agree that there is a strong sense of community in Calgary, and at least 80 per cent of Calgarians report high levels of satisfaction, sense of belonging, attachment and civic pride.
Target 114
By 2010, at least 75 per cent of Calgarians report that they volunteer for the benefit of others who are outside their circles of family and friends.

Recent Milestones

2014

Donations for Personal Care Items
Date:
Feb 02, 2014

We realized that homeless need more than just warm clothes so we sought to raise $500 to buy personal care items like toothpaste, toothbrushes, lip balm, soap, feminine hygiene products and more. Through an active and engaging social media campaign we surpassed our goal and raised $1293 - that's 259% of our goal!

Bi-fold bike safety cards

We printed and distributed 21,000 bi-fold bike safety cards.  The cards were worded and designed by CAN-Bike cycling instructors, and provide great input for safe cycling.  We have distributed these cards to the City of Calgary Police, City of Calgary Transportation department, BikeBridge in Lethbridge, Edmonton Bicycle Commuter Society, ATB, AMA, Red Deer Bicycle Commuters, Councillor Mulder at the City of Red Deer, and we gave 4000 to BikeCalgary to distribute to various bike shops in Calgary.  

 

 There are three Es to most things in life; engineering, education, and enforcement.  All cycling infrastructure is part of the solution, and is the engineering component in this E.  We at Alberta Bike Swap are providing the education component to support cycling infrastructure.  

100 Year Goals and Targets

Energy

Target 5
By 2036, 30 per cent of Calgary’s energy derives from low-impact renewable sources.
Target 22
By 2036, we reduce the annual private vehicle kilometres travelled per capita by 20 per cent.
Target 25
By 2036, there is a 50 per cent reduction from 1990 levels in the pollution (greenhouse gases) associated with automobiles.
Target 26
By 2036, we increase peak period transit, walking and cycling and carpool travel to downtown by 50 per cent, 40 per cent and 20 per cent respectively.
Target 29
By 2036, the number of on-street bikeways increases by 200 per cent, and the number of pathways by 100 per cent.

Recent Milestones

Distribution of Bike Safety Cards
Date:

VAGABOND Brewery

Vagabond Brewery sees the transformation of an existing restaurant into a hip Victoria Park beer hall hangout.

With a prime location nearby Calgary's Stampede grounds, the project posed a challenge to our design team: design and construction needed to be completed in a mere 4 weeks. Completed on schedule, Vagabond Brewery was up and running for 2013's Stampede season!

Integrating creative reuse into our design approach, the 5,000 square foot space features many innovative examples of reclaimed materials. 

 

 

100 Year Goals and Targets

Food

Target 10
By 2010, 100 per cent of Calgarians have access to nutritious foods.
Target 31
By 2036, 85 per cent of the waste generated within Calgary is diverted from landfills.
Target 32
By 2036, 75 per cent of construction industry waste materials are recovered for reuse and/or recycling.
Target 33
By 2036, 85 per cent of waste materials are converted to other useful products.

Recent Milestones

2013

Date:
Jun 15, 2013

Pathways 2 Sustainability Calgary 2013

Pathways 2 Sustainability (P2S) is an interactive conference experience that bridges knowledge to experience and is designed to nurture knowledge transfer and learning. This is the place to be exposed to innovation and leadership, while fostering relationships and incubating sustainable solutions for Alberta’s communities! Pathways is hosted in a different city each year and we are proud to call Calgary home to Pathways 2013 as we explore the multiple dimensions of prosperity and Calgary’s ambitions to be a sustainable city. With the collective support of our Host Sponsors; TELUS Spark, the City of Calgary and Sustainable Resources Ltd., over 20 volunteer steering committee members from across the region, and our Sponsors and Partners. This year’s conference is going to set the bar for future years. Pathways is a must attend experience for industry and municipal sustainability

Community, Culture and Commerce

The inspiration the conference theme comes from the vision, goals and needs identified in collaboration with host community champions and leaders. The conference theme for 2013 primarily emerged as an exploration of imagineCalgary (the Sustainability Plan for Calgary) and the elements of Community, Culture, and Commerce that contribute to the vision of sustainability for the “economic capital of Canada”. These elements include aspects of the built environment; how we shape and design our communities; the energy, water and waste we consume; innovative ways to create liveable spaces; celebrating and enabling opportunities for cultural expression; and the role of industry and commerce in shaping the green economy.

100 Year Goals and Targets

Communications

Target 3
By 2036, Calgarians increase their use of communications technology to support sustainability.
Target 5
By 2036, 30 per cent of Calgary’s energy derives from low-impact renewable sources.
Target 6
By 2036, all new and retrofitted communities, buildings, vehicles, equipment and processes are built to be within five per cent of the highest energy-efficient design available out of all economically competitive products, as measured on a life cycle basis.
Target 9
By 2036, 100 per cent of Calgary’s food supply derives from sources that practice sustainable food production.
Target 12
By 2016, Calgary has a strong and diverse portfolio of locally based businesses.
Target 14
By 2036, we are developing “complete communities” that, among other aspects, allow people to obtain daily goods and services within a reasonable walking distance from home.
Target 15
By 2036, all new commercial buildings are designed to encourage the use of alternative forms of transportation (e.g. walking, cycling and transit).
Target 16
By 2036, all new and retrofitted non-residential buildings are built to be within five per cent of the highest energy- and water-efficient design available out of all economically competitive products, as measured on a life cycle basis.
Target 18
By 2016, we are developing “complete communities” that enable people to meet most of their daily needs within a reasonable walking distance from home.
Target 31
By 2036, 85 per cent of the waste generated within Calgary is diverted from landfills.
Target 33
By 2036, 85 per cent of waste materials are converted to other useful products.

Economic well-being

Target 35
By 2036, the number of environmentally sustainable and commercially viable value-added products and technologies produced in Calgary increases by 100 per cent.
Target 36
By 2036, Calgary’s non-oil-related industries grow by 50 per cent.
Target 37
By 2036, Calgary is ranked as the most favourable Canadian city in which to establish businesses that support sustainability practices.
Target 39
By 2036, alternative ways to measure economic well-being are commonly used to support sustainability principles in decision-making.

Air

Target 68
By 2036, the use of low-impact renewable energy increases by 30 per cent as a percentage of total energy use.
Target 82
By 2036, effective impervious areas are reduced equal to or below 30 per cent to restore natural hydrograph and become less susceptible to flooding.

Lifelong learning

Target 99
By 2016, 100 per cent of adult Calgarians have access to a full range of formal and informal quality learning opportunities and resource options that allow them to achieve their full potentials in life.
Target 102
By 2036, 100 per cent of Calgarians report that they feel respected and supported in their pursuits of meaning, purpose and connectedness, and that they extend respect and support to others who meet this need in ways different from their own.
Target 112
By 2010, 90 per cent of Calgarians agree that there is a strong sense of community in Calgary, and at least 80 per cent of Calgarians report high levels of satisfaction, sense of belonging, attachment and civic pride.

Get to Know the Bow River

“Get to Know the Bow River” is a lavishly illustrated booklet that provides readers with a general overview and some intriguing details about the Bow River and Calgary’s special relationship with it. Written by local watershed experts and volunteers with a passion for river conservation and recreation, the 20-page booklet contains a wealth of information and inspiration for Calgarians and naturalists everywhere. Divided into 12 sections, topics include the Bow River’s geological history, Calgary’s urban footprint on the landscape and how we manage it, features of dynamic fluvial and alluvial ecosystems, risks and benefits of flooding, aspects of aquatic ecology and fisheries, and water management opportunities for communities and individuals to help reduce the impacts of our own activities and lifestyles. This booklet is meant to inform, engage and motivate people to see and appreciate the Bow River through a new lens – a fish-eye lens – because sometimes “we forget that the water cycle and the life cycle are one” (Jacques Cousteau).

100 Year Goals and Targets

Economic well-being

Target 39
By 2036, alternative ways to measure economic well-being are commonly used to support sustainability principles in decision-making.

Air

Target 71
By 2036, Calgary’s ecological decreases to below the 2001 Canadian average of 7.25 hectares per capita.
Target 77
By 2036, Calgary’s ecological footprint decreases to below the 2001 Canadian average of 7.25 hectares per capita.
Target 78
By 2036, native biological diversity increases to healthy levels, as measured through Habitat Suitability Index indices and local key indicator species.
Target 79
By 2036, the number and/or size of protected or restored habitats increases to a state of health and functionality.
Target 81
By 2036, positive rates of flow in the Bow River Basin are maintained to keep aquatic ecosystems at these levels.
Target 82
By 2036, effective impervious areas are reduced equal to or below 30 per cent to restore natural hydrograph and become less susceptible to flooding.
Target 83
By 2036, watershed health — as measured by loss of wetlands, water quality, non-compliance with pollution standards, in-stream flow and groundwater levels — improves.
Target 84
By 2036, Calgary’s ecological footprint decreases to below the 2001 Canadian average of 7.25 hectares per capita.

Aesthetic enjoyment

Target 85
By 2036, 90 per cent of citizens report that Calgary is a beautiful city.
Target 86
By 2036, 95 per cent of Calgarians report that they have a range of opportunities for the aesthetic enjoyment of nature, arts and culture.
Target 90
By 2036, all Calgarians live in a safe and clean natural environment, as measured by the quality of its air, water, soil and food sources, plus by the lack of exposure to toxic waste.
Target 108
By 2036, 100 per cent of Calgarians report that they can access a range of high-quality recreational experiences, regardless of gender, socio-economic status, age, ability, religion, race, sexual orientation or heritage.
Target 114
By 2010, at least 75 per cent of Calgarians report that they volunteer for the benefit of others who are outside their circles of family and friends.

City of Calgary’s 2020 Sustainability Direction

The City of Calgary’s 2020 Sustainability Direction is a strategic guide for transformation that identifies what must happen at The City by 2020 to contribute towards the imagineCALGARY 100-year vision. The 2020 Sustainability Direction was developed through cross-departmental collaboration and was completed in 2011. It now serves as a guide for decision makers to link decisions and project planning to the long-term, and functions as the foundation for business planning processes at The City. In this way, the 2020 Directions serves as a 10 year milestone for The City to bridge the iC long-term vision, goals and targets. The 2020 Sustainability Direction aligns with 84 of the iC targets.

100 Year Goals and Targets

Economic well-being

Target 39
By 2036, alternative ways to measure economic well-being are commonly used to support sustainability principles in decision-making.

Air

Target 71
By 2036, Calgary’s ecological decreases to below the 2001 Canadian average of 7.25 hectares per capita.
Target 77
By 2036, Calgary’s ecological footprint decreases to below the 2001 Canadian average of 7.25 hectares per capita.
Target 78
By 2036, native biological diversity increases to healthy levels, as measured through Habitat Suitability Index indices and local key indicator species.
Target 79
By 2036, the number and/or size of protected or restored habitats increases to a state of health and functionality.
Target 81
By 2036, positive rates of flow in the Bow River Basin are maintained to keep aquatic ecosystems at these levels.
Target 82
By 2036, effective impervious areas are reduced equal to or below 30 per cent to restore natural hydrograph and become less susceptible to flooding.
Target 83
By 2036, watershed health — as measured by loss of wetlands, water quality, non-compliance with pollution standards, in-stream flow and groundwater levels — improves.
Target 84
By 2036, Calgary’s ecological footprint decreases to below the 2001 Canadian average of 7.25 hectares per capita.

Aesthetic enjoyment

Target 85
By 2036, 90 per cent of citizens report that Calgary is a beautiful city.
Target 86
By 2036, 95 per cent of Calgarians report that they have a range of opportunities for the aesthetic enjoyment of nature, arts and culture.
Target 90
By 2036, all Calgarians live in a safe and clean natural environment, as measured by the quality of its air, water, soil and food sources, plus by the lack of exposure to toxic waste.
Target 108
By 2036, 100 per cent of Calgarians report that they can access a range of high-quality recreational experiences, regardless of gender, socio-economic status, age, ability, religion, race, sexual orientation or heritage.
Target 114
By 2010, at least 75 per cent of Calgarians report that they volunteer for the benefit of others who are outside their circles of family and friends.
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